Everyone snores for different reasons, so before you can find a cure, you must first identify what makes you snore.

There are a number of proven techniques that can help you eliminate snoring, but it may take time. Lifestyle changes including, altering your sleeping position, losing weight and reducing alcohol intake can help you combat snoring.

There are also a number of products that can really help you stop snoring. This guide is designed to help you find solutions and is not an alternative to medical advice.

Support your head

Image from Silentnight©

If your head and neck are not properly supported your airways can be restricted. This puts stress on your throat muscles and causes snoring.

The SlumberSlumber Contour Memory Foam Pillow with Silver is ideal for helping keep your airways open and offering superb comfort. The wonderfully soft pillow cover incorporates Silver Ions technology. This offers natural antibacterial properties to you and your pillow,  helping to provide a healthier, peaceful night’s sleep.

Allergies

Many people suffer from allergies particularly in the bedroom that can cause inflammation in the nose and throat. This can lead to snoring.

Anti-allergy bedding, such as Allersafe is blended with Amicor Pure Acrylic Fibre. This fibre boasts anti-bacterial and anti-fungal additives, creating an environment that is unsuitable for dust mites to survive.

Snoring that is caused by a dust mite allergy brings the dual distress of irritated throat and nose combined with snoring. The Allersafe range of bedding can prevent the allergic reaction and improve snoring.

Mouth and Nose

If your snoring is not allergy related, try the Good Night Anti Snore Ring, which uses acupressure to help eliminate snoring and work in harmony with your body’s biorhythms. This minimises the vibrating of the soft palate at the back of the mouth which is the common cause of snoring. By having a permanent gap in the front of the mouthpiece it also ensures a constant airflow at all times during sleep.

 

For more information and advice about snoring and other sleep issues, visit the SlumberSlumber sleep clinic.

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