Is bed wetting the sign of something more serious?

Is bed wetting the sign of something more serious?

Wetting the bed – also known medically as nocturnal enuresis – can be embarrassing, upsetting and have a detrimental effect on your confidence as it can happen at any time during sleep or napping.

Bed Wetting in Children

In many cases of bed wetting in children this is not a sign of anything serious, but simply a phase in their development. Children are most likely to wet the bed regularly (at least twice a week) aged four and a half1 and the chances of them wetting the bed decrease as they get older. If bed wetting is effecting your child’s social life, for example preventing them from going on trips or having sleepovers, then visit your GP for advice.

There are also a number of tips on how to help your child improve their bladder control in the SlumberSlumber Sleep Clinic.

Bed Wetting in Adults

If you are wetting the bed as an adult and are unsure why, it may be due to a number of causes; from drinking late at night, having an oversensitive bladder or a urinary tract infection. Take a look at the SlumberSlumber sleep clinic for more common causes of adult bed wetting.

Something more serious?

Diabetes 

Bed wetting can be a symptom of diabetes, for example. People with diabetes have abnormal blood sugar levels and to compensate for this the body creates lots of sugary urine, which is why diabetics are often also thirsty. Coupled with weak bladder control, this can lead to bed-wetting during sleep.

Prostate/bladder issues

Wetting the bed could also be a symptom of an enlarged prostate as a result of infection or cancer. Or you may have something physically wrong with your bladder, causing it to weaken.

Sleep apnoea

This can also lead to bed wetting as your brain focusses more on obtaining more oxygen than other, less important, bodily functions such as bladder control.

Bed wetting can often be managed or treated, but the first port of call is always your GP.

For more advice about other sleep-related issues visit the SlumberSlumber Sleep Clinic. For products that can help keep you dry at night visit our bed wetting product page.

Is bed wetting the sign of something more serious?

Wetting the bed – also known medically as nocturnal enuresis – can be embarrassing, upsetting and have a detrimental effect on your confidence as it can happen at any time during sleep or napping.Bed Wetting in ChildrenIn many cases of bed wetting in children this is...

5 Top Tips to conquer bed wetting in adults

Bed wetting is very much a taboo subject, particularly in adults and while it might not remove the embarrassment, it’s important to know that nocturnal enuresis (bed wetting) is involuntary and not your fault. There are many factors that can contribute to an adult...

What should I do if my child is wetting the bed?

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I’m a grown adult – why am I wetting the bed?

Wetting the bed as an adult can be distressing, but it is much more common than you might think. 1% of adults1 will experience bed wetting (also known as nocturnal enuresis) in their lifetime and it can lead to sufferers limiting the activities they take part in such...

Bed Wetting: What is it and how can I stop it?

What is bed wetting? Nocturnal enuresis or bed wetting as it’s more commonly known can be very worrying, often causing frustration and embarrassment in both children and adults. Many people wet the bed, with one in every 1001 people affected...
I’m a grown adult – why am I wetting the bed?

I’m a grown adult – why am I wetting the bed?

Wetting the bed as an adult can be distressing, but it is much more common than you might think. 1% of adults1 will experience bed wetting (also known as nocturnal enuresis) in their lifetime and it can lead to sufferers limiting the activities they take part in such as holidays, long journeys and sharing a bed with a partner.

Nocturnal enuresis / bed wetting can happen any time you fall asleep, whether that be in your own bed, on a sun lounger or even a long train journey!

Persistent adult bed wetting

If you’re wetting the bed persistently it could be due to two reasons:

  • Primary enuresis

If you’ve wet the bed continuously since childhood it’s likely that you have primary enuresis. There are many causes of primary enuresis, such as having a small volume functional bladder capacity, which means your brain thinks your bladder is full and signals to release when in fact it is only half full. Alternatively, you could have the opposite problem and find that your bladder over-fills because your brain does not produce enough antidiuretic hormone to tell your body to wake up and visit the bathroom.

You may have an overactive or unstable bladder or simply be a very heavy sleeper.

Many of these causes can be treated with help from your Doctor and relieved in the mean-time with mattress protectors and night pads.

  • Secondary enuresis

Regardless of whether you wet the bed as a child, if you have started wetting the bed again – or for the first time – as an adult then there is probably a secondary underlying cause to your bed wetting.

Common secondary causes include:

  • Diabetes
  • Urinary tract infections (UTIs)
  • Stress and anxiety
  • Sleep Apnoea
  • Some medicines and sleeping tablets

If you have started wetting the bed as an adult it’s best to talk to your Doctor to help work out the reasons why.

Adult bed wetting – one time

If you’ve wet the bed just once or twice as an adult it could be down to a urinary tract infection or the types and amount of liquid that you drink.

Diuretic drinks such as caffeinated drinks and alcohol can irritate your bladder causing it to quickly produce more urine, drank late at night these could cause you to wet the bed.

If you’d like more information about bed wetting visit the SlumberSlumber Sleep Clinic and make an appointment with your GP if you’re feeling concerned.

For products that can help keep you dry at night visit our bed wetting product page.

Is bed wetting the sign of something more serious?

Wetting the bed – also known medically as nocturnal enuresis – can be embarrassing, upsetting and have a detrimental effect on your confidence as it can happen at any time during sleep or napping.Bed Wetting in ChildrenIn many cases of bed wetting in children this is...

5 Top Tips to conquer bed wetting in adults

Bed wetting is very much a taboo subject, particularly in adults and while it might not remove the embarrassment, it’s important to know that nocturnal enuresis (bed wetting) is involuntary and not your fault. There are many factors that can contribute to an adult...

What should I do if my child is wetting the bed?

Firstly, don’t panic. Bed wetting is extremely common in children and many will grow out of it over time.The medical name for bed wetting is nocturnal enuresis and describes a condition where a person passes urine during the night and is most prevalent in...

I’m a grown adult – why am I wetting the bed?

Wetting the bed as an adult can be distressing, but it is much more common than you might think. 1% of adults1 will experience bed wetting (also known as nocturnal enuresis) in their lifetime and it can lead to sufferers limiting the activities they take part in such...

Bed Wetting: What is it and how can I stop it?

What is bed wetting? Nocturnal enuresis or bed wetting as it’s more commonly known can be very worrying, often causing frustration and embarrassment in both children and adults. Many people wet the bed, with one in every 1001 people affected...
What are night sweats and how do I combat them?

What are night sweats and how do I combat them?

What are night sweats?

Waking up during the night to find yourself, your bed and your bed clothing drenched in sweat is an uncomfortable feeling. Sometimes, this can simply be caused by a warm evening and general overheating. However, if this happens frequently on cool evenings, you may be suffering from night sweats.

This is a common problem and there are several factors that could be causing those uncomfortable, sweaty nights.

  1. Temperature

    If your night sweats occur infrequently and usually on warm evenings, then you may be just too warm! By investing in some lighter bed clothing and bedding you will help to make your slumber more cool and comfortable.

  2. Food and drink

    Drinking alcohol or eating spicy food before bed is not only a cause of snoring but it can also increase your chances of night sweats. By avoiding excessive amounts of alcohol or spicy foods and by making sure you drink plenty of water before bed, you will help keep your sleep as cool and as silent as possible.

  3. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea

    Obstructive Sleep Apnoea is also a known cause of night sweats. It is a condition where the walls of your throat contract, interrupting normal breathing during sleep. For more information on Sleep Apnoea and how to combat it, read this article: What is the difference between snoring and sleep apnoea?

  4. Medication

    If you are currently taking medication such as birth control pills, antidepressants and other psychiatric drugs, these will often list night sweats as a side effect. Contact your local GP for more information about the side effects of your medication if you feel it may be interrupting your sleep.

  5. Illness

    Other medical factors could be the root of your night sweats including hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar), tuberculosis, endocarditis and early symptoms of certain cancers. Night sweats are not usually a sign of illness but if you are unsure then a trip to your GP may help you determine the cause of your uncomfortable nights.

  6. Menopause

    The menopause is often linked with night sweats, due to reduced oestrogen levels.

Night sweats caused by menopause and hot flashes

Two of the largest causes of night sweats in women are hot flushes (also called hot flashes) and menopause. Despite being incredibly natural and normal, both of these can be unpleasant. These don’t necessarily need to be treated with medication, but they can be uncomfortable and sometimes lead to feelings of tiredness and irritability.

Menopause

Menopause is a natural phase that affects all women, signalling the end of menstruation. Fifty-one is the average age for a woman to experience menopause in the UK. The change in a woman’s oestrogen levels can cause several emotional and physical symptoms, such as night sweats and hot flushes.

Hot flushes and hot flashes

Sometimes referred to as a ‘hot flash’, hot flushes occur when women suddenly feel too warm, seemingly with no explanation and can be related to changes in circulation. Hot flushes can sometimes happen at night as night sweats.

Hot flushes can be linked to premenstrual overheating, and also with the menopause. Avoiding triggers such as caffeine, alcohol and spicy foods are a good way of helping to reduce hot flushes, although they cannot be avoided entirely.

Natural remedies for night sweats

You don’t need to rush straight to the doctor to ease night sweats. There are several natural remedies and tactics that can keep you cool and comfortable, such as yoga and cooling aids such as ice packs. It’s time to unpack that electric fan, too!

Read this article for natural remedies to help combat night sweats.

Men and night sweats

Men can also suffer from night sweats, too. Night sweats in men can be related to hormone levels, possibly indicating low testosterone. Research has suggested that men who work out may be conditioned to sweat at lower temperatures than expected and so night sweats could be a sign of overtraining. However, before altering your lifestyle dramatically, visit your GP to discuss the causes and symptoms.

Products to combat night sweats

There is no need to suffer with night sweats. By keeping cool at night, you may be able to help to combat your uncomfortable nights. SlumberSlumber offers a wide range of products to help you gain a peaceful, cooler night’s sleep.

Pure Australian Wool Duvet 300 gsm Light Weight

The temperature regulating qualities of wool makes the Pure Australian Wool Duvet perfect for couples and for warm sleepers.

Chillow Pillow

The Chillow is a unique cooling pillow pad offering relief from premenstrual overheating, night sweats and hot flushes so are the perfect solution for hot sleepers and warm summer nights.

SlumberSlumber offers advice and tips on a range of sleep issues from allergies to snoring. For guidance on a wide range of sleep problems visit the SlumberSlumber sleep clinic.

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Signs you should see your GP about snoring

Signs you should see your GP about snoring

For 1 in 4 of us, snoring is a normal part of everyday life. However, severe snoring can have a detrimental effect on our health, if left untreated.

How severe is my snoring?

The NHS advises that there are three ‘grades’ of snoring:

Grade one – infrequent, fairly quiet snoring. It’s unlikely that this type of snoring will be affecting your breathing, so there should be no health concerns.

Grade two – snoring at least three nights per week. If you snore regularly you may experience some difficulty breathing which could be affecting your health.

If you are experiencing mild snoring levels, there are a number of products that work to combat snoring. There are also a number of simple lifestyle changes you can make to alleviate snoring, such as losing weight, sleeping on your side, or avoiding spicy food – here are 10 things you didn’t know about snoring.

Grade three – loud snoring every night. If the sound of your snoring can be heard in another room, you may have obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Sufferers of obstructive sleep apnoea find that their airways become partially or fully blocked during sleep, preventing oxygen from reaching the brain and causing the body to wake or remain in only light sleep. Loud snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea can lead to feeling extremely tired the next day and have a serious effect on your day to day life.

When should I visit my GP because of snoring?

One of the main symptoms of severe snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea is a feeling of excessive tiredness. Excessive tiredness caused by snoring and sleep apnoea can affect your ability to drive, work and concentrate, it can also cause symptoms of irritability, headaches, anxiety, depression and a lack of interest in sex. Left untreated, these symptoms can worsen over time, so see your GP if you’re experiencing any of the above, or are concerned.

Snoring not only affects your health, but it can also cause serious relationship issues between you and your partner as they struggle to sleep through the sound of snoring. If this is the case, visit your GP for advice and try these snoring products that really work.

Snoring can affect people of all ages, but if your baby or child snores, take them to see your GP as it could be a sign of an underlying health problem.

For more information and advice about snoring and other sleep issues, visit the SlumberSlumber sleep clinic.

Snoring Guide

Do you suffer from snoring? Here at Slumber Slumber, we value your sleep so have created a handy snoring guide so you can tackle your snoring and get back to sleeping soundly at night. There are many causes of snoring and this guide to snoring is designed to help you...

Signs you should see your GP about snoring

For 1 in 4 of us, snoring is a normal part of everyday life. However, severe snoring can have a detrimental effect on our health, if left untreated. How severe is my snoring? The NHS advises that there are three ‘grades’ of snoring: Grade one – infrequent, fairly...

How to stop your partner snoring

Snoring is incredibly common. With the statistics showing that 1 in 4 people snore, it’s likely that you’ll sleep in the same room or next door to a snorer at some point in your life. However, if your partner snores, this can have a negative effect on your health and...

What is the difference between snoring and sleep apnoea?

Understanding the differences between sleep apnoea and snoring is the first step to effective treatment of both conditions. What causes snoring? Snoring is caused by the vibration of respiratory structures due to obstructed air movement while you’re asleep. It can...

10 things you didn’t know about snoring

Snoring is incredibly common, but why do we suffer from snoring? In this post we cover ten facts about snoring that you may not have known. Everyone snores for different reasons, but there are many ways we can adapt our lifestyle to keep your snoring to a minimum.

Snoring products that actually work

Everyone snores for different reasons, so before you can find a cure, you must first identify what makes you snore. There are a number of proven techniques that can help you eliminate snoring, but it may take time. Lifestyle changes including, altering your sleeping...

Snoring – what is it and how can I stop it?

What is Snoring? Snoring is defined as any ‘turbulent’ airflow between the nose and the upper throat. The snorting or grunting noise heard indicates that there is a blockage somewhere in the air passages. The majority of people snore on occasion, but if snoring...
How to stop your partner snoring

How to stop your partner snoring

Snoring is incredibly common. With the statistics showing that 1 in 4 people snore, it’s likely that you’ll sleep in the same room or next door to a snorer at some point in your life. However, if your partner snores, this can have a negative effect on your health and even your relationship. So what can you do to help your partner have a silent night?

Sleep talk

Start by having a conversation. Especially if this is a new relationship, it’s a good idea to get a sense of what the person is feeling. It may be that he or she simply isn’t aware that they snore, or if they are aware, they may not understand to what extent it’s affecting their sleep.  Some snorers are fully aware that they snore but find it an embarrassing subject to talk about.

Change your sleeping position

It’s also a good idea to look at the position your partner sleeps in. Sleeping on your side or stomach is a good way to prevent snoring, so ask your partner to ‘train’ themselves to not sleep on their back. There are various different ways of doing this, from sewing a tennis ball into the back of their pyjamas to propping up pillows behind them to stop them from rolling over.

Is my partner’s health affecting his or her snoring?

Snoring can also be caused by diet. Drinking alcohol before bed, for example, may lead to snoring. Spicy food has also been found to be a contributing factor, so is being overweight. It’s also worth bearing in mind that smoking affects tissue in the nose which can make it harder to breathe. So if your partner is a smoker, this may be a reason why they snore.

Do we need to visit a doctor about my partners snoring?

Sometimes snoring can be a sign of more serious problems. Find out if you should visit your GP in this article.

What products will help my partner to stop snoring?

Find out whether your partner has ever tried any remedies for their snoring in the past. If not, there are several options you can try. Clearing your nasal passage helps you breathe better at night. Discover more products that can really help you stop snoring here.

But, before a visit to the GP, try and figure out the reason why your partner snores. Once you’ve done this, you can work together to figure out a way to help you both get a sounder night’s sleep.

For more information and advice about snoring and other sleep issues, visit the SlumberSlumber sleep clinic.

Snoring Guide

Do you suffer from snoring? Here at Slumber Slumber, we value your sleep so have created a handy snoring guide so you can tackle your snoring and get back to sleeping soundly at night. There are many causes of snoring and this guide to snoring is designed to help you...

Signs you should see your GP about snoring

For 1 in 4 of us, snoring is a normal part of everyday life. However, severe snoring can have a detrimental effect on our health, if left untreated. How severe is my snoring? The NHS advises that there are three ‘grades’ of snoring: Grade one – infrequent, fairly...

How to stop your partner snoring

Snoring is incredibly common. With the statistics showing that 1 in 4 people snore, it’s likely that you’ll sleep in the same room or next door to a snorer at some point in your life. However, if your partner snores, this can have a negative effect on your health and...

What is the difference between snoring and sleep apnoea?

Understanding the differences between sleep apnoea and snoring is the first step to effective treatment of both conditions. What causes snoring? Snoring is caused by the vibration of respiratory structures due to obstructed air movement while you’re asleep. It can...

10 things you didn’t know about snoring

Snoring is incredibly common, but why do we suffer from snoring? In this post we cover ten facts about snoring that you may not have known. Everyone snores for different reasons, but there are many ways we can adapt our lifestyle to keep your snoring to a minimum.

Snoring products that actually work

Everyone snores for different reasons, so before you can find a cure, you must first identify what makes you snore. There are a number of proven techniques that can help you eliminate snoring, but it may take time. Lifestyle changes including, altering your sleeping...

Snoring – what is it and how can I stop it?

What is Snoring? Snoring is defined as any ‘turbulent’ airflow between the nose and the upper throat. The snorting or grunting noise heard indicates that there is a blockage somewhere in the air passages. The majority of people snore on occasion, but if snoring...

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