Snoring Guide

Snoring Guide

Do you suffer from snoring? Here at Slumber Slumber we value your sleep so have created a handy snoring guide so you can tackle your snoring and get back to sleeping soundly at night.

There are many causes of snoring and this guide to snoring is designed to help you find solutions and is not an alternative to medical advice.

Support

A pillow that does not support your neck and head properly can cause snoring. If your head and neck are not properly supported your airways can be restricted as a result this puts undue stress on your throat muscles and causes snoring.

The Tempur Original range of pillows is waved shaped with two heights to offer an optimal sleeping posture. The memory foam inner moulds to the shape of your head and neck giving you extra support and as a result, helps to keep your airways open.

Dunlopillo Kontour has been designed to give you support and comfort. The wave shape offers two height levels and Dunlopillo’s natural latex filling offers cooling comfort with its unique pores that let excess heat escape. This pillow is ideal for helping keep your airways open and offering superb comfort.

Allergies

Many people suffer from allergies particularly in the bedroom, dust mites can cause inflammation in the nose and throat and this can cause snoring.

Anti-allergy bedding such as Allersafe is blended with Amicor Pure Acrylic Fibre that inhibits the growth and development of dust mites. Snoring that is caused by a dust mite allergy brings the dual distress of irritated throat and nose combined with snoring. The Allersafe range of bedding can prevent the allergic reaction and improve snoring.

Mouth and Nose

Mouth: Open your mouth and try to make a snoring noise. Then close your mouth and try and make the same noise. If you can only make the noise with your mouth open you’re a mouth breather.

Nose: Allergies can cause your nose to swell and prevent correct breathing patterns. Therefore using anti-allergy bedding could be one option, as mentioned above.

The Good Night Anti Snore Ring uses acupressure to help eliminate snoring and work in harmony with your body’s biorhythms. The ring uses two acupressure points, SI2 & HT9 to help alleviate snoring and increase the natural flow of your body’s energy. We are so confident that if you are not satisfied with the ring within the first 30 days we offer a money back guarantee!

Mouth Exercises

Studies show that by performing simple mouth exercises, like pronouncing certain vowel sounds and exercising the tongue in specific ways, the muscles in your mouth are strengthened and can, therefore, reduce snoring.

The following exercises can help to do this;

  1. Repeat each vowel (a-e-i-o-u) out loud for three minutes a few times a day.
  2. Place the tip of your tongue behind your top front teeth. Slide your tongue backwards for three minutes a day.
  3. Close your mouth and purse your lips. Hold for 30 seconds.
  4. With your mouth open, move your jaw to the right and hold for 30 seconds. Repeat on the left side.
  5. With your mouth open, contract the muscle at the back of your throat repeatedly for 30 seconds.
  6. For a more fun exercise, simply spend time singing. Singing can increase muscle control in the throat and soft palate, reducing snoring caused by relaxed muscles1.

Snoring Guide

Do you suffer from snoring? Here at Slumber Slumber we value your sleep so have created a handy snoring guide so you can tackle your snoring and get back to sleeping soundly at night. There are many causes of snoring and this guide to snoring is designed to help you...

Signs you should see your GP about snoring

For 1 in 4 of us, snoring is a normal part of everyday life. However, severe snoring can have a detrimental effect on our health, if left untreated. How severe is my snoring? The NHS advises that there are three ‘grades’ of snoring: Grade one – infrequent, fairly...

How to stop your partner snoring

Snoring is incredibly common. With the statistics showing that 1 in 4 people snore, it’s likely that you’ll sleep in the same room or next door to a snorer at some point in your life. However, if your partner snores, this can have a negative effect on your health and...

What is the difference between snoring and sleep apnoea?

Understanding the differences between sleep apnoea and snoring is the first step to effective treatment of both conditions. What causes snoring? Snoring is caused by the vibration of respiratory structures due to obstructed air movement while you’re asleep. It can...

10 things you didn’t know about snoring

Snoring is incredibly common, but why do we suffer from snoring? In this post we cover ten facts about snoring that you may not have known. Everyone snores for different reasons, but there are many ways we can adapt our lifestyle to keep your snoring to a minimum.

Snoring products that actually work

Everyone snores for different reasons, so before you can find a cure, you must first identify what makes you snore. There are a number of proven techniques that can help you eliminate snoring, but it may take time. Lifestyle changes including, altering your sleeping...

Snoring – what is it and how can I stop it?

What is Snoring? Snoring is defined as any ‘turbulent’ airflow between the nose and the upper throat. The snorting or grunting noise heard indicates that there is a blockage somewhere in the air passages. The majority of people snore on occasion, but if snoring...
Is your snoring caused by an allergy?

Is your snoring caused by an allergy?

It may not be one of the first reasons you think of for snoring, but if you feel as though breathing through your nose isn’t smooth or that your nasal passages are being obstructed, then your snoring may be caused by an allergy.

This snoring can manifest in two ways:

  1. Nasal breathing may become louder and sound more like a rumbling or whistling noise.
  2. Your nose may become so blocked that you are forced to breathe through your mouth.

Common causes of snoring

Allergic Rhinitis is a common cause of snoring, which is an inflammation of the inside of the nose caused by an allergen, such as pollen, dust, mould or flakes of skin from certain animals.

If you find that you snore less when you sleep away from your bedroom, then this is a good indication that you have a dust allergy.

Dust could be causing you to snore

Dust gathers in our homes as a result of flaking skin, which in turn encourages dust mites. If you are allergic to these allergens, breathing through your nose may become difficult, which can cause you to snore.

If you find that you snore less when you sleep away from your bedroom, then this is a good indication that you have a dust allergy.

What should you do if you have a dust allergy?

If you think your snoring is as a result of a dust allergy, the best solution is to clean… clean… clean! Clear out the contents of your bedroom and move aside your bedroom furniture to find all the dust that has gathered around them and vacuum until clear.

There could also be dust mites living in your bedding, for example in your pillows and duvet. These should be cleaned as per washing instructions. It’s also recommended that you vacuum your mattress on both sides and then fit a mattress protector.

Once your room is clean, you may be surprised by the difference it makes.

What other allergies cause snoring?

An allergy to pet hair is a common cause of snoring and this may become worse if your pet has been in your bedroom or sitting on your bed. Substances such as perfumes, cosmetics, fabric softeners, air fresheners and insect sprays can all cause allergy type symptoms.

You may also think you are suffering from a feather allergy, but in fact this is very rare. So-called ‘feather allergy’ is more often than not an allergic reaction to the dust mite allergen (see above) that is hidden in an unwashed pillow or duvet, no matter the filling.

For more information and advice about allergies and other sleep issues, visit the SlumberSlumber sleep clinic.

Signs you should see your GP about snoring

Signs you should see your GP about snoring

For 1 in 4 of us, snoring is a normal part of everyday life. However, severe snoring can have a detrimental effect on our health, if left untreated.

How severe is my snoring?

The NHS advises that there are three ‘grades’ of snoring:

Grade one – infrequent, fairly quiet snoring. It’s unlikely that this type of snoring will be affecting your breathing, so there should be no health concerns.

Grade two – snoring at least three nights per week. If you snore regularly you may experience some difficulty breathing which could be affecting your health.

If you are experiencing mild snoring levels, there are a number of products that work to combat snoring. There are also a number of simple lifestyle changes you can make to alleviate snoring, such as losing weight, sleeping on your side, or avoiding spicy food – here are 10 things you didn’t know about snoring.

Grade three – loud snoring every night. If the sound of your snoring can be heard in another room, you may have obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Sufferers of obstructive sleep apnoea find that their airways become partially or fully blocked during sleep, preventing oxygen from reaching the brain and causing the body to wake or remain in only light sleep. Loud snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea can lead to feeling extremely tired the next day and have a serious effect on your day to day life.

When should I visit my GP because of snoring?

One of the main symptoms of severe snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea is a feeling of excessive tiredness. Excessive tiredness caused by snoring and sleep apnoea can affect your ability to drive, work and concentrate, it can also cause symptoms of irritability, headaches, anxiety, depression and a lack of interest in sex. Left untreated, these symptoms can worsen over time, so see your GP if you’re experiencing any of the above, or are concerned.

Snoring not only affects your health, but it can also cause serious relationship issues between you and your partner as they struggle to sleep through the sound of snoring. If this is the case, visit your GP for advice and try these snoring products that really work.

Snoring can affect people of all ages, but if your baby or child snores, take them to see your GP as it could be a sign of an underlying health problem.

For more information and advice about snoring and other sleep issues, visit the SlumberSlumber sleep clinic.

Snoring Guide

Do you suffer from snoring? Here at Slumber Slumber we value your sleep so have created a handy snoring guide so you can tackle your snoring and get back to sleeping soundly at night. There are many causes of snoring and this guide to snoring is designed to help you...

Signs you should see your GP about snoring

For 1 in 4 of us, snoring is a normal part of everyday life. However, severe snoring can have a detrimental effect on our health, if left untreated. How severe is my snoring? The NHS advises that there are three ‘grades’ of snoring: Grade one – infrequent, fairly...

How to stop your partner snoring

Snoring is incredibly common. With the statistics showing that 1 in 4 people snore, it’s likely that you’ll sleep in the same room or next door to a snorer at some point in your life. However, if your partner snores, this can have a negative effect on your health and...

What is the difference between snoring and sleep apnoea?

Understanding the differences between sleep apnoea and snoring is the first step to effective treatment of both conditions. What causes snoring? Snoring is caused by the vibration of respiratory structures due to obstructed air movement while you’re asleep. It can...

10 things you didn’t know about snoring

Snoring is incredibly common, but why do we suffer from snoring? In this post we cover ten facts about snoring that you may not have known. Everyone snores for different reasons, but there are many ways we can adapt our lifestyle to keep your snoring to a minimum.

Snoring products that actually work

Everyone snores for different reasons, so before you can find a cure, you must first identify what makes you snore. There are a number of proven techniques that can help you eliminate snoring, but it may take time. Lifestyle changes including, altering your sleeping...

Snoring – what is it and how can I stop it?

What is Snoring? Snoring is defined as any ‘turbulent’ airflow between the nose and the upper throat. The snorting or grunting noise heard indicates that there is a blockage somewhere in the air passages. The majority of people snore on occasion, but if snoring...
How to stop your partner snoring

How to stop your partner snoring

Snoring is incredibly common. With the statistics showing that 1 in 4 people snore, it’s likely that you’ll sleep in the same room or next door to a snorer at some point in your life. However, if your partner snores, this can have a negative effect on your health and even your relationship. So what can you do to help your partner have a silent night?

Sleep talk

Start by having a conversation. Especially if this is a new relationship, it’s a good idea to get a sense of what the person is feeling. It may be that he or she simply isn’t aware that they snore, or if they are aware, they may not understand to what extent it’s affecting their sleep.  Some snorers are fully aware that they snore but find it an embarrassing subject to talk about.

Change your sleeping position

It’s also a good idea to look at the position your partner sleeps in. Sleeping on your side or stomach is a good way to prevent snoring, so ask your partner to ‘train’ themselves to not sleep on their back. There are various different ways of doing this, from sewing a tennis ball into the back of their pyjamas to propping up pillows behind them to stop them from rolling over.

Is my partner’s health affecting his or her snoring?

Snoring can also be caused by diet. Drinking alcohol before bed, for example, may lead to snoring. Spicy food has also been found to be a contributing factor, so is being overweight. It’s also worth bearing in mind that smoking affects tissue in the nose which can make it harder to breathe. So if your partner is a smoker, this may be a reason why they snore.

Do we need to visit a doctor about my partners snoring?

Sometimes snoring can be a sign of more serious problems. Find out if you should visit your GP in this article.

What products will help my partner to stop snoring?

Find out whether your partner has ever tried any remedies for their snoring in the past. If not, there are several options you can try. Clearing your nasal passage helps you breathe better at night. Discover more products that can really help you stop snoring here.

But, before a visit to the GP, try and figure out the reason why your partner snores. Once you’ve done this, you can work together to figure out a way to help you both get a sounder night’s sleep.

For more information and advice about snoring and other sleep issues, visit the SlumberSlumber sleep clinic.

Snoring Guide

Do you suffer from snoring? Here at Slumber Slumber we value your sleep so have created a handy snoring guide so you can tackle your snoring and get back to sleeping soundly at night. There are many causes of snoring and this guide to snoring is designed to help you...

Signs you should see your GP about snoring

For 1 in 4 of us, snoring is a normal part of everyday life. However, severe snoring can have a detrimental effect on our health, if left untreated. How severe is my snoring? The NHS advises that there are three ‘grades’ of snoring: Grade one – infrequent, fairly...

How to stop your partner snoring

Snoring is incredibly common. With the statistics showing that 1 in 4 people snore, it’s likely that you’ll sleep in the same room or next door to a snorer at some point in your life. However, if your partner snores, this can have a negative effect on your health and...

What is the difference between snoring and sleep apnoea?

Understanding the differences between sleep apnoea and snoring is the first step to effective treatment of both conditions. What causes snoring? Snoring is caused by the vibration of respiratory structures due to obstructed air movement while you’re asleep. It can...

10 things you didn’t know about snoring

Snoring is incredibly common, but why do we suffer from snoring? In this post we cover ten facts about snoring that you may not have known. Everyone snores for different reasons, but there are many ways we can adapt our lifestyle to keep your snoring to a minimum.

Snoring products that actually work

Everyone snores for different reasons, so before you can find a cure, you must first identify what makes you snore. There are a number of proven techniques that can help you eliminate snoring, but it may take time. Lifestyle changes including, altering your sleeping...

Snoring – what is it and how can I stop it?

What is Snoring? Snoring is defined as any ‘turbulent’ airflow between the nose and the upper throat. The snorting or grunting noise heard indicates that there is a blockage somewhere in the air passages. The majority of people snore on occasion, but if snoring...
What is the difference between snoring and sleep apnoea?

What is the difference between snoring and sleep apnoea?

Understanding the differences between sleep apnoea and snoring is the first step to effective treatment of both conditions.

What causes snoring?

Snoring is caused by the vibration of respiratory structures due to obstructed air movement while you’re asleep.

It can affect the:

  • nasal passages
  • soft palate – a soft layer of tissue at the back of the roof of the mouth
  • a base of the tongue
  • tonsils – two small glands above the tongue where the mouth meets the throat
  • uvula – a small cone-shaped section of tissue that hangs from the soft palate between the tonsils

What is sleep apnoea?

Snoring3Sleep apnoea is a serious sleep disorder that occurs when a person’s breathing is interrupted during sleep. If left untreated, sleep apnoea can result in the sufferer’s breathing stopping repeatedly during their sleep – sometimes hundreds of times. As a result, this means that the brain and the rest of the body may not be getting enough oxygen.

Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA) is the most common type of apnoea and occurs where there is a physical blockage of airflow. Individuals with OSA are usually unaware that they have the condition, and the problem is often recognised by their partner or someone who sleeps in the same room.

What causes OSA?

It’s normal for the muscles and soft tissues in the throat to relax and collapse to some degree while sleeping.

For most people, this doesn’t cause breathing problems, but in people with OSA the airway has narrowed as the result of a number of factors, including:

  • being overweight or obese
  • having a large neck
  • taking medicines that have a sedative effect, such as sleeping tablets
  • having an unusual structure in the neck, such as a narrow airway, large tonsils, adenoids or tongue, or a small lower jaw
  • smoking or drinking alcohol, particularly before going to sleep

It’s not unusual for someone suffering from sleep apnoea to feel fatigued during the day, as well as it affecting your work performance, vigilance, motivation and other behavioural or cognitive effects.

How do snoring and OSA impact a good night’s sleep?

Both sleep disorders reduce your quality of sleep and cause daytime fatigue. Inadequate sleep can result in weight gain, memory loss, skin ageing, as well as a negative effect on your relationship.

If you are a frequent loud snorer, you should consult your GP and be tested for sleep apnoea before beginning any treatment.

What are the treatment options for snoring and OSA?

Treatment options for individuals suffering from snoring and OSA vary significantly, from conservative treatment to invasive surgical treatment.

Snoring treatments range from lifestyle changes, such as weight loss, a decrease in alcohol consumption, a change in sleep position, to oral devices and nasal strips.

Treatment of OSA usually involves drastic lifestyle changes, upper airway surgery and oral appliances. Another treatment option is to use a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure device (CPAP), which is a machine that keeps the patient’s airway open during sleep by delivering a continuous flow of pressurized air into the throat.

For more information and advice about snoring and other sleep issues, visit the SlumberSlumber sleep clinic.

Snoring Guide

Do you suffer from snoring? Here at Slumber Slumber we value your sleep so have created a handy snoring guide so you can tackle your snoring and get back to sleeping soundly at night. There are many causes of snoring and this guide to snoring is designed to help you...

Signs you should see your GP about snoring

For 1 in 4 of us, snoring is a normal part of everyday life. However, severe snoring can have a detrimental effect on our health, if left untreated. How severe is my snoring? The NHS advises that there are three ‘grades’ of snoring: Grade one – infrequent, fairly...

How to stop your partner snoring

Snoring is incredibly common. With the statistics showing that 1 in 4 people snore, it’s likely that you’ll sleep in the same room or next door to a snorer at some point in your life. However, if your partner snores, this can have a negative effect on your health and...

What is the difference between snoring and sleep apnoea?

Understanding the differences between sleep apnoea and snoring is the first step to effective treatment of both conditions. What causes snoring? Snoring is caused by the vibration of respiratory structures due to obstructed air movement while you’re asleep. It can...

10 things you didn’t know about snoring

Snoring is incredibly common, but why do we suffer from snoring? In this post we cover ten facts about snoring that you may not have known. Everyone snores for different reasons, but there are many ways we can adapt our lifestyle to keep your snoring to a minimum.

Snoring products that actually work

Everyone snores for different reasons, so before you can find a cure, you must first identify what makes you snore. There are a number of proven techniques that can help you eliminate snoring, but it may take time. Lifestyle changes including, altering your sleeping...

Snoring – what is it and how can I stop it?

What is Snoring? Snoring is defined as any ‘turbulent’ airflow between the nose and the upper throat. The snorting or grunting noise heard indicates that there is a blockage somewhere in the air passages. The majority of people snore on occasion, but if snoring...

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