Signs you have Fibromyalgia

Signs you have Fibromyalgia

What are the signs and symptoms of Fibromyalgia?

Fibromyalgia has many symptoms that tend to vary from person to person. The main symptom is a widespread pain throughout the body.

There may be periods when your symptoms will vary maybe getting worse and then getting better. This can depend on factors such as:

  • Stress
  • Changes in the weather
  • Physical activity

Symptoms of Fibromyalgia

  • Widespread Pain
    One of the main symptoms for fibromyalgia is likely to be a widespread pain. This may be felt throughout your body but could be worse in particular areas, such as your back or neck. The pain can feel like an ache, a sharp stabbing pain or a burning sensation.
  • Extreme Sensitivity
    Fibromyalgia can make you extremely sensitive to pain, and you may find that even being touched is painful. If you hurt yourself, the pain may continue for much longer than it normally would. You may also be sensitive to things such as smoke, certain foods and bright lights.
  • Stiffness
    Fibromyalgia can make you feel stiff. The stiffness may be most severe when you’ve been in the same position for a long period of time, meaning symptoms can be often worse in the morning. It can also cause your muscles to spasm, which is when they contract (squeeze) tightly and painfully.
  • Fatigue
    Fibromyalgia can cause fatigue. This can range from a mild, tired feeling to severe exhaustion. Fatigue may come on suddenly and can drain you of all your energy. 
  • Poor Sleep
    You may wake up feeling tired, even when you’ve had a good night’s rest. This is because Fibromyalgia can sometimes stop you from sleeping deeply enough to refresh yourself properly. This is often described as “non-restorative sleep.”
  • Cognitive Problems (Fibro-Fog)
    Cognitive problems are issues related to thinking and learning. If you have fibromyalgia, you may have trouble remembering and learning new things, problems with attention and concentration.
  • Headaches
    Due to the stiffness in your back and neck, you may also have frequent headaches. These can vary from mild to severe migraines.

Other symptoms:

  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
  • Dizziness and clumsiness
  • Feeling too hot or too cold – this is because you’re not able to regulate your body temperature properly
  • Restless legs syndrome
  • Tingling, numbness, prickling or burning sensations in your hands and feet
  • In women, unusually painful periods
  • Anxiety
  • Depression

If you are suffering from these symptoms it is important that you contact your GP for proper diagnosis and medical advice1.

Find out more about fibromyalgia here.

Sleep and Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia's impact on sleep Sleep and fibromyalgia don't go well together. Sleep disturbances are very common for sufferers of the condition. While they may not have difficulty falling asleep, their sleep is likely to be light and easily disturbed so when they wake...

Treating Fibromyalgia

Don't worry, you've got this! There are many options for treating fibromyalgia. It's important to remember that treatment for fibromyalgia will try to ease some of your symptoms and improve your overall quality of life, but there's currently no cure. First Steps Your...

Signs you have Fibromyalgia

What are the signs and symptoms of Fibromyalgia? Fibromyalgia has many symptoms that tend to vary from person to person. The main symptom is a widespread pain throughout the body. There may be periods when your symptoms will vary maybe getting worse and then getting...

What Causes Fibromyalgia?

We have learnt about the condition, but now we will explore what causes Fibromyalgia. When your body is in pain, your brain’s the first to know it. Nerve signals travel from the painful spot on your body through your spinal cord to your brain, which interprets these...

What is Fibromyalgia?

Fibromyalgia, also known as fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), is a long-term health condition that causes widespread muscle and joint pain, as well as other symptoms. What is fibromyalgia? You may have heard of it before, but just what is Fibromyalgia? It is the most...
What Causes Fibromyalgia?

What Causes Fibromyalgia?

We have learnt about the condition, but now we will explore what causes Fibromyalgia.

When your body is in pain, your brain’s the first to know it. Nerve signals travel from the painful spot on your body through your spinal cord to your brain, which interprets these signals as pain. This is a warning sign that something’s wrong. As you heal, the pain gets better, and in time it goes away. But if you have fibromyalgia, you experience this pain even without injury, this pain does not go away and has a lasting impact on your life.

Some doctors believe this is caused by the way your brain and spinal cord handle and interpret pain signals. When you have fibromyalgia you may have more cells that carry pain signals than normal. And you may have fewer cells that slow pain signals down. This means your pain volume is always turned up, like music blasting on a radio. The result is that minor bumps and bruises hurt more than they should. And you may feel pain from things that shouldn’t hurt at all.

Doctors aren’t sure why some people get fibromyalgia. There are many contributing factors that could cause your pain signals to be affected. Different people report different things that seemed to trigger their condition and you can even have more than one cause.

 

Causes:

  • Genetic factors
    Fibromyalgia tends to run in families. Your parents may pass on genes that make you more sensitive to pain. Other genes can also make you more likely to feel anxious or depressed, which makes pain worse.
  • Other conditions
    A painful disease like arthritis or an infection raises your chances of getting fibromyalgia.
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
    Experiencing traumatic events is also linked to developing fibromyalgia.
  • Gender
    The condition is much more prominent in women than in men. Doctors think this could be related to differences in the way men and women feel and react to pain, as well as how society expects them to respond to pain.
  • Anxiety and depression
    These and other mental health disorders seem to be linked to fibromyalgia, though there’s no proof that they actually cause the condition.
  • Lack of physical activity
    The condition is much more common in people who aren’t physically active. Low impact exercise is one of the best treatments for fibromyalgia to help control the condition and improves symptoms for some patients.

Sleep and Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia's impact on sleep Sleep and fibromyalgia don't go well together. Sleep disturbances are very common for sufferers of the condition. While they may not have difficulty falling asleep, their sleep is likely to be light and easily disturbed so when they wake...

Treating Fibromyalgia

Don't worry, you've got this! There are many options for treating fibromyalgia. It's important to remember that treatment for fibromyalgia will try to ease some of your symptoms and improve your overall quality of life, but there's currently no cure. First Steps Your...

Signs you have Fibromyalgia

What are the signs and symptoms of Fibromyalgia? Fibromyalgia has many symptoms that tend to vary from person to person. The main symptom is a widespread pain throughout the body. There may be periods when your symptoms will vary maybe getting worse and then getting...

What Causes Fibromyalgia?

We have learnt about the condition, but now we will explore what causes Fibromyalgia. When your body is in pain, your brain’s the first to know it. Nerve signals travel from the painful spot on your body through your spinal cord to your brain, which interprets these...

What is Fibromyalgia?

Fibromyalgia, also known as fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), is a long-term health condition that causes widespread muscle and joint pain, as well as other symptoms. What is fibromyalgia? You may have heard of it before, but just what is Fibromyalgia? It is the most...
What is Fibromyalgia?

What is Fibromyalgia?

Fibromyalgia, also known as fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), is a long-term health condition that causes widespread muscle and joint pain, as well as other symptoms.

What is fibromyalgia?

You may have heard of it before, but just what is Fibromyalgia? It is the most common musculoskeletal condition after osteoarthritis and more common in women aged 25-60 1.

Sufferers of fibromyalgia often have specific trigger points on their body which are very painful to touch. Even without taking part in any activity or movement, muscles may feel overworked and sore. Some patients experience severe pain around the joints in the neck, back, shoulders, and hips. This makes it very difficult to sleep and causes extreme fatigue.

In the past, fibromyalgia was often confused with degenerative joint disease or muscular rheumatism. But fibromyalgia isn’t linked with inflammatory or degenerative arthritis despite the symptoms being similar.

It is important for people with fibromyalgia to have a regular sleep pattern. While we sleep our body rejuvenates, sleep disturbance can make the pain worse. While the condition does not cause any long-term damage to the body, it is important to keep active to avoid weakening the muscles. It is common for symptoms to come and go, be more severe, or even to remission only to reappear later and often there is no known reason or trigger for this.

The chronic pain of fibromyalgia means sufferers often become inactive and miss out on social gatherings because of the pain. This can cause a person to become withdrawn and isolated which can even lead to depression.

Do you think you have fibromyalgia?

Find out more about Fibromyalgia here and learn about how to get support from Fibromyalgia U.K.

 

Sleep and Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia's impact on sleep Sleep and fibromyalgia don't go well together. Sleep disturbances are very common for sufferers of the condition. While they may not have difficulty falling asleep, their sleep is likely to be light and easily disturbed so when they wake...

Treating Fibromyalgia

Don't worry, you've got this! There are many options for treating fibromyalgia. It's important to remember that treatment for fibromyalgia will try to ease some of your symptoms and improve your overall quality of life, but there's currently no cure. First Steps Your...

Signs you have Fibromyalgia

What are the signs and symptoms of Fibromyalgia? Fibromyalgia has many symptoms that tend to vary from person to person. The main symptom is a widespread pain throughout the body. There may be periods when your symptoms will vary maybe getting worse and then getting...

What Causes Fibromyalgia?

We have learnt about the condition, but now we will explore what causes Fibromyalgia. When your body is in pain, your brain’s the first to know it. Nerve signals travel from the painful spot on your body through your spinal cord to your brain, which interprets these...

What is Fibromyalgia?

Fibromyalgia, also known as fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), is a long-term health condition that causes widespread muscle and joint pain, as well as other symptoms. What is fibromyalgia? You may have heard of it before, but just what is Fibromyalgia? It is the most...
An Introduction to Asthma

An Introduction to Asthma

What is asthma?

Asthma is a common lung condition that causes occasional breathing difficulties.

It’s estimated that 300 million people worldwide suffer from it. It is a chronic lung condition characterised by recurrent breathing problems. Sufferers experience symptoms such as breathlessness, wheezing, chest tightness, and coughing.

Our airways carry air in and out of your lungs. If you have asthma, they are very sensitive. Certain things can trigger the muscles around your airways to tighten, making them narrower. The airway lining also becomes inflamed causing a build-up of sputum. This makes them even narrower still. With narrow airways, it’s harder to get air in and out of your lungs1.

It affects people of all ages and often starts in childhood, although it can also develop for the first time in adults.

There’s currently no cure. However there are simple treatments that can help keep the symptoms under control so it doesn’t have a big impact on your life 2.

Find out more about the condition here.

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