Are Menopause and Insomnia Linked?

Are Menopause and Insomnia Linked?

‘The Change’, ‘The Climacteric’, ‘the time of life’ – whatever you want to call it, all women will experience the menopause. It’s a time of major change in every woman’s life. During perimenopause (the time period leading to your last menstrual period), your ovaries begin to produce lower amounts of key hormones. This includes estrogen and progesterone. As these hormone levels fall, menopausal symptoms increase. Once such symptom is insomnia. Read below to find out how menopause and insomnia are linked, and what you can do to help yourself sleep well to feel well.

You can read more about the menopause in our topic, Menopause and Sleep.

What Is Insomnia?

Insomnia is a disorder that keeps you from getting the adequate sleep that your body needs every night to recover from and process the day’s events. You may have a hard time falling asleep, staying asleep, or even getting up in the morning. More specifically, people with insomnia may:

  • Take thirty minutes or more to fall asleep
  • Get fewer than six hours of sleep on three or more nights each week
  • Wake up before their alarm goes off, and not be able to go back to sleep
  • Not feel rested or refreshed after sleeping
  • Feel sleepy or tired during the day
  • Worry about the quality of their sleep on a regular basis

Overtime, the loss of quality sleep can be detrimental to your mental and physical health. Not only will you feel tired, but insomnia could also make you feel anxious, stressed, or irritated. You could also have a hard time concentrating or remembering things. Plus, poor sleep could lead to you suffering from an upset stomach. Read more about how sleep is important for your health here.

If you’re going through the menopause, struggling with menopausal symptoms are bad enough on their own. The last thing you need is more difficult symptoms that are due to not getting enough sleep.

Is There A Connection Between Menopause and Insomnia?

About 61% of women who are in the postmenopausal stage experience frequent bouts of insomnia. Going through the menopause can affect your sleep cycle on three different levels.1

1) Hormone Changes

Your progesterone levels decrease during the menopause. Progesterone is a sleep-producing hormone, so the changes in this hormone level can trigger a change in your sleeping habits. As your progesterone levels dwindle, you may find it harder to fall asleep, and stay asleep.2

2) Hot Flushes

Hot flushes, or hot flashes, and night sweats are two of the most common side effects of the menopause. As your hormone levels fluctuate, you may feel as if you’re having sudden surges and drops in your body temperature. Instead, you’re actually experiencing a surge of adrenaline that’s caused by the rapid decrease of hormones. This is the same chemical that’s responsible for your reaction to stress or a fight-or-flight scenario. Your body may have a hard time recovering from this sudden surge of energy, making it difficult for you to get back to sleep.3

3) Medications

Just as natural and hormonal changes can interfere with your sleep, so can changes caused by any medications or supplements that you’re taking.4 Sleep disturbance can be a side-effect of many medications. If you’re beginning a new medicine or using over-the-counter supplements, check with your doctor about any side effects that could be keeping you awake at night-time.

To find out what else can lead to insomnia, have a look at our topic, Insomnia, for more information.

How Is Insomnia Diagnosed?

Your doctor will focus on your sleeping habits. This will normally include when you would wake up, go to sleep, and how tired you feel during the day. They may also ask if you have restless nights or sleep soundly. Plus, your doctor may want you to keep a sleep diary for a period of time – while this may seem like a hassle if you want a quick fix, it’s actually a great way to monitor your sleep. A sleep diary will help your doctor check for patterns that they can recognise as signs of insomnia, or another sleeping disorder.

Your doctor could also want to check for any underlying conditions that may cause insomnia, so it’s possible that they’ll carry out a physical exam. If your doctor is unable to determine why you’re not sleeping well, they may refer you to a sleep expert.

Is Insomnia Treated Differently When It’s Linked to Menopause?

If your insomnia is linked to menopause, you may find relief through balancing your hormone levels. There are several ways to do this, including Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT), low-dose birth control, low-dose antidepressants, or even taking melatonin. Melatonin is the sleep hormone, so taking it could help you feel more tired when you want to get to sleep.5

However, you should always consult your doctor about these methods of relieving your menopausal symptoms. Your doctor can talk you through the medications, any side effects, and which method is right for you. Do not take any treatments without talking to your doctor first.

Are There Other Ways to Treat Insomnia?

While many causes of insomnia don’t have cures or treatments, there are a few things you can do to help yourself sleep well to get through the menopause a bit better.

Establish a Healthy Sleeping Environment

Sometimes the reason you’re struggling with insomnia is something that we wouldn’t normally think of – the bedroom. You should have a bedroom that’s cool, dark, and quiet. The ideal room temperature is between 16°C and 18°C, with the absolute maximum being 24°C.6

Also, make sure that you’re sleeping in a room that is as dark as possible. Turn off all the lights, and even turn off your phone. The blinking lights of your mobile phone, or the screen lighting up, can alert your brain even when you’re asleep. You could be waking up during the night because of this. It’s also a good idea to minimise any light that comes into your room from outside, whether it’s sunlight or artificial light from the streetlamp. Consider blockout curtains if light is disturbing your sleep. Our blockout curtains boast a 90 – 95% blockout, and you can have a look at them here.

Your room should also be as quiet as possible. Turn off the radio or TV, remove ticking clocks, and shut down any appliances to help lull yourself into a good night’s sleep.

When Do You Eat?

If you have a slight snack or a glass of milk before you go to bed, this likely won’t interfere with your sleep. However, tucking into a big meal before you climb into bed could be a recipe for a restless night. Going to sleep on a full stomach may cause heartburn and acid reflux, both of which could make you uncomfortable while you sleep. This will make you more likely to wake up during the night. Eating earlier in the evening is a good way to help yourself sleep more soundly. You can read more about how food affects your sleep here.

Practice Relaxation Techniques

Finding a way to unwind and relax after a long day can help you ease into a restful sleep. Gentle yoga or mild stretching before going to bed could help you calm your mind and feel more relaxed – the perfect state you should be in when going to sleep. You could also try mindfulness, a way of relaxing by focusing on the moment and going through your senses. Find out more about how mindfulness can help you sleep well here.

Quit Smoking and Avoid Alcohol

If you smoke, you may find that sleep is even more elusive during perimenopause and the menopause. The nicotine in tobacco products is a stimulant, and this can prevent your brain from relaxing enough to let you fall asleep.7 It’s the same with drinking – while alcohol is a sedative, the effect won’t last. Alcohol prevents deep stages of restorative sleep, so the sleep that you’re getting isn’t doing much for your body as you’re not getting the recovery that your body needs. Plus, alcohol can lead to bathroom trips during the night, and you might struggle to get back to sleep. Therefore, by quitting smoking and reducing your alcohol consumption, you could help yourself sleep well again. You’ll also improve your general health, and this’ll help your sleep.

Take A Nap

Napping isn’t just for children – everyone can benefit from it. While you can’t just put your head down anytime while at work, why not take a power nap during your lunch? If you can get a quick nap, take it, but don’t nap for more than twenty minutes. If you do, you could fall into a deeper sleep that’ll be harder to wake up from. Instead of feeling refreshed and energised, you could feel groggy and perhaps even more tired than before your nap.

Stay Hydrated

If you’re struggling to stay awake, get a glass of water. Water can help to keep your natural energy up.8

Listen to Your Body

As you age, your internal clock changes. If you always stayed up late, you may find that you now want to go to sleep earlier. Or, if you were an early bird, you might now get up a bit later in the morning. If this is the case, change your sleep routine – your body is changing, so your sleeping needs are changing, too. By listening to your body, you could sleep well again.9

Remember, these are only ideas for how you could improve your sleep. Insomnia can be a challenge to overcome, especially with menopausal symptoms keeping you from feeling your best. Likewise, insomnia could make menopausal symptoms even worse. Consult your doctor if you’re struggling to sleep well. Your doctor can talk you through how to relieve symptoms of menopause and insomnia, while also looking for anything else that could be keeping you from getting a good night’s sleep.

Are Menopause and Insomnia Linked?

‘The Change’, ‘The Climacteric’, ‘the time of life’ – whatever you want to call it, all women will experience the menopause. It’s a time of major change in every woman’s life. During perimenopause (the time period leading to your last menstrual period), your ovaries...

Cooling Products That Work to Help You Sleep

Disrupted sleep is one of the most common problems that women experience with menopause. From hot flushes and night sweats, getting a good night’s sleep can be a challenge. Without a good sleep, you’ll wake up feeling irritable and moody, and this may only make your...

Six Myths About the Menopause and the Truth Behind Them

Although every woman experiences the menopause, every woman will experience it differently. Because of this, there are many different perspectives about the menopause and its symptoms. Below, you’ll find six of the most common myths of menopause and the truth behind...

Treating Menopausal Symptoms for Better Sleep Quality

Menopause can be a time of major hormonal, physical and psychological change for women. Although symptoms vary from woman to woman, “as many as 61%” of women have reported insomnia problems   , both during perimenopause and post-menopause. Difficulty sleeping during...

Signs That You May Have the Menopause

Although all women experience the menopause, some will be fortunate enough to breeze through it without struggling with any symptoms. However, most women will experience menopausal symptoms, some of which can be quite severe and affect your...

What Is the Menopause?

‘The Change’, ‘the Climacteric’, ‘the time of life’, whatever you want to call it; all woman will experience the menopause, but what is it? As a woman gets older, there is a change in the balance of the body’s sex hormones. Your ovaries stop producing as much of the...

Cooling Products That Work to Help You Sleep

Cooling Products That Work to Help You Sleep

Disrupted sleep is one of the most common problems that women experience with menopause. From hot flushes and night sweats, getting a good night’s sleep can be a challenge. Without a good sleep, you’ll wake up feeling irritable and moody, and this may only make your other menopausal symptoms worse. To make these symptoms – and your life – easier, make sure that you improve your quality of sleep. Below, you’ll find three great cooling products that work to help you sleep, so you’ll wake up feeling refreshed and ready for the day ahead.

Velfont Viscofresh Cooling Pillow

The Viscofresh Cooling Pillow from Velfont will keep you at just the right temperature during the night; not too hot, and not too cold. Made with Outlast technology, this cooling pillow regulates your body temperature while you’re sleeping. It also buffers temperature variations so that you reach your ideal comfort. It’s Smart fabric proactively provides a specific thermal comfort zone for each person. This means that, if you have a hot flush during the night, the heat is stored in the pillow’s thermoregulating fabric. This heat is then released when your body temperature decreases. This creates a climate-controlled sleep, so you won’t suffer from disturbed sleep when you get too warm. If you do wake up and feel warm, simply roll over or flip the pillow over to find a cold spot, as the pillow is continuously cool to the touch. Read more about the pillow’s benefits here.

Glaciertex Double Ice Cooling Mattress Protector

This mattress protector has been designed with a dynamic response to environmental changes throughout the night. As well as creating a cool and dry climate, this mattress protector repels moisture and heat away from your body, reducing sweat while you sleep peacefully. This makes the mattress protector a great choice for women who suffer from night sweats during the menopause. Its Double Ice Technology fabric features cooling fibres woven into the fabric for a cool-to-the-touch feel. If you get too warm, simply roll over and you’ll easily find another cold spot to keep you cool and comfortable. So, if hot flushes or night sweats – or both – interrupt your sleep, you won’t find it as difficult to get back to sleep. Find out more about how this protector works to help you sleep here.

Glaciertex Double Ice Cooling Pillow Protector

If you don’t want the full cooling effect of the mattress protector, or if you want to complete the cooling to its maximum effect, this cooling pillow protector from Glaciertex is also available. Similarly designed with thermoregulation technology, this pillow protector repels moisture and heat away from your body, reducing sweat while you sleep. With a cool-to-the-touch feel, this pillow protector will keep you at a comfortable temperature during the night. If you do wake up and find that the protector has warmed, simply move your head or flip the pillow over to find that the rest of the pillow is still refreshingly cool. Perfect for women who suffer from hot flushes and night sweats, this pillow protector makes sure that you never lose a cold spot again. Plus, getting back to sleep won’t be as difficult. Read more on how this pillow protector works for you here.

Are Menopause and Insomnia Linked?

‘The Change’, ‘The Climacteric’, ‘the time of life’ – whatever you want to call it, all women will experience the menopause. It’s a time of major change in every woman’s life. During perimenopause (the time period leading to your last menstrual period), your ovaries...

Cooling Products That Work to Help You Sleep

Disrupted sleep is one of the most common problems that women experience with menopause. From hot flushes and night sweats, getting a good night’s sleep can be a challenge. Without a good sleep, you’ll wake up feeling irritable and moody, and this may only make your...

Six Myths About the Menopause and the Truth Behind Them

Although every woman experiences the menopause, every woman will experience it differently. Because of this, there are many different perspectives about the menopause and its symptoms. Below, you’ll find six of the most common myths of menopause and the truth behind...

Treating Menopausal Symptoms for Better Sleep Quality

Menopause can be a time of major hormonal, physical and psychological change for women. Although symptoms vary from woman to woman, “as many as 61%” of women have reported insomnia problems   , both during perimenopause and post-menopause. Difficulty sleeping during...

Signs That You May Have the Menopause

Although all women experience the menopause, some will be fortunate enough to breeze through it without struggling with any symptoms. However, most women will experience menopausal symptoms, some of which can be quite severe and affect your...

What Is the Menopause?

‘The Change’, ‘the Climacteric’, ‘the time of life’, whatever you want to call it; all woman will experience the menopause, but what is it? As a woman gets older, there is a change in the balance of the body’s sex hormones. Your ovaries stop producing as much of the...

Six Myths About the Menopause and the Truth Behind Them

Six Myths About the Menopause and the Truth Behind Them

Although every woman experiences the menopause, every woman will experience it differently. Because of this, there are many different perspectives about the menopause and its symptoms. Below, you’ll find six of the most common myths of menopause and the truth behind them.

1. The Symptoms are Purely Physical

While you’ll experience hot flushes, night sweats, and possible weight gain, as menopause is due to the gradual decrease of the hormone oestrogen, there are also psychological symptoms. These include low mood, reduced motivation, anxiety, feelings of low self-esteem, irritability, panic attacks, poor concentration, and low energy.

2. Sleep Problems Have Nothing to Do with Menopause

They do – from perimenopause to post-menopause, women report the most sleeping problems1. Often, these problems are the result of hot flushes, insomnia, and mood disorders. To improve the quality of your sleep, try working aerobic exercise into your week on a regular basis. Avoid caffeine, as it can take eight hours to leave your system, and keeping your bedroom cool and comfortable may hold hot flushes at bay. Find other tips to enjoy better sleeping here.

3. Night Sweats Are the Only Menopause-related Sleep Disorder

Although night sweats are one cause of sleeplessness during menopause, they are not the only reason for interrupted sleep. Menopause causes a drop in the hormone oestrogen, which helps us fall asleep, and promotes a better-quality sleep. So, when our oestrogen levels fall, so does our ability to get a good night’s sleep. As well as this, hot flushes can contribute to poor sleep.

4. If You Have Hot Flushes, You Will Get Night Sweats

This is not necessarily true, as all women experience menopausal symptoms differently. Some women will only have hot flushes, some will only have night sweats, and some will experience both. It’s important to remember that both hot flushes and night sweats will vary in severity from woman to woman. It’s possible to have mild night sweats that can be easily prevented with a regular bedtime and a cool bedroom temperature, but others may have night sweats so severe that they completely disrupt any chance of sleep – if this is the case, check in with your doctor.

5. Menopause Begins at The Age Of 50

While the average age of women experiencing the menopause is 51 in the UK, a woman can start to experience menopausal symptoms between the ages of 45-55. Plus, around one in a hundred women under the age of 40 in the UK experiences premature menopause.2

6. Depression Is Inevitable

While menopause can cause poor sleep quality, which leads to feeling irritable and moody, mood swings are not the same as clinical depression. If your mood swings extend into a lengthy period of lethargy, sadness, and a lack of interest in life, it’s possible that a clinical depression is setting in. If you find yourself feeling like this, consult your doctor.

Are Menopause and Insomnia Linked?

‘The Change’, ‘The Climacteric’, ‘the time of life’ – whatever you want to call it, all women will experience the menopause. It’s a time of major change in every woman’s life. During perimenopause (the time period leading to your last menstrual period), your ovaries...

Cooling Products That Work to Help You Sleep

Disrupted sleep is one of the most common problems that women experience with menopause. From hot flushes and night sweats, getting a good night’s sleep can be a challenge. Without a good sleep, you’ll wake up feeling irritable and moody, and this may only make your...

Six Myths About the Menopause and the Truth Behind Them

Although every woman experiences the menopause, every woman will experience it differently. Because of this, there are many different perspectives about the menopause and its symptoms. Below, you’ll find six of the most common myths of menopause and the truth behind...

Treating Menopausal Symptoms for Better Sleep Quality

Menopause can be a time of major hormonal, physical and psychological change for women. Although symptoms vary from woman to woman, “as many as 61%” of women have reported insomnia problems   , both during perimenopause and post-menopause. Difficulty sleeping during...

Signs That You May Have the Menopause

Although all women experience the menopause, some will be fortunate enough to breeze through it without struggling with any symptoms. However, most women will experience menopausal symptoms, some of which can be quite severe and affect your...

What Is the Menopause?

‘The Change’, ‘the Climacteric’, ‘the time of life’, whatever you want to call it; all woman will experience the menopause, but what is it? As a woman gets older, there is a change in the balance of the body’s sex hormones. Your ovaries stop producing as much of the...

Treating Menopausal Symptoms for Better Sleep Quality

Treating Menopausal Symptoms for Better Sleep Quality

Menopause can be a time of major hormonal, physical and psychological change for women. Although symptoms vary from woman to woman, “as many as 61%” of women have reported insomnia problems

 

, both during perimenopause and post-menopause. Difficulty sleeping during this time can be attributed to hot flushes, night sweats, or mood swings. It can also be caused by hormonal changes, as levels of oestrogen and progesterone, a sleep-promoting hormone, are decreasing. If you wake up at night, it may take some time to settle and fall back asleep. While your total sleep time may not suffer, your sleep quality will, and this can cause next-day fatigue. Below, you’ll find some ideas to help you get to sleep – and stay asleep.

 

Hormone Replacement Therapy

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) is a treatment that relieves menopausal symptoms by replacing the hormones that are at a lower level as you approach the menopause. However, HRT can increase the risk of breast cancer

 

, so always consult your doctor for more information before you decide if HRT is right for you.

 

Follow Good Sleep Hygiene

A regular sleep schedule will improve the quality of your sleep. You should try to go to sleep and wake up at the same time every day – including weekends. Making your bedroom cool and dark will also help you fall asleep easier. Avoid watching TV, doing work, or any other hobbies in bed as your brain will associate your bed with these activities. As a result, you’ll find it harder to switch off when the lights go off. If you wake up during the night or have trouble falling asleep for more than twenty minutes, get out of bed and go to another room. Your brain will associate your bed with sleeplessness if you stay in bed, so it’s best to avoid this.

Have A Soothing Bedtime Routine

Relaxing before bedtime will improve the quality of your sleep. Taking a warm bath before going to bed is a great way to unwind. As the hot water evaporates from your skin, your body will naturally cool down and you’ll feel more tired. You can also practice meditation or deep breathing exercises. Writing down any stressful or worrying thoughts you have in a journal to clear your mind is another good way to settle at night. Plus, you can try drinking bedtime tea or a glass of milk to help you relax.

Invest In Cool, Comfortable Bedding

As hot flushes and night sweats are some of the most common attributes to poor quality of sleep, having bedding that regulates body heat temperatures is a great idea. Many mattresses feature cooling comfort layers, while cooling pillows and mattress toppers help to keep your body temperature steady, so you won’t wake up as often when your body heat fluctuates. Browse cooling pillow and mattress protectors here. Choosing sheets that are made of breathable cotton will also keep you from getting too warm. You could also consider waterproof mattress toppers that will give you complete peace of mind.

Invest in A Weighted Blanket

A weighted blanket may help you relax and sleep better. Weighted blankets act like a steady hug, providing firm yet gentle pressure on the body. This has been shown to help people feel less anxious and more relaxed, as it also promotes the production of serotonin, the “happy chemical”. The deep pressure that the blanket provides is a form of therapy called Deep Pressure Stimulation, and you can find out more about it here. Browse our selection of weighted blankets, and find the right weight for you – it’s recommended that you choose a blanket that is about 10% of your body weight.

Exercise

Exercise regularly, in the morning and outside if possible. Natural sunlight will give you an energy boost if you’ve had a poor sleep, and it’ll also help your brain maintain regular circadian rhythm. Find out more about circadian rhythm here.

You can read more about how exercise helps improve your sleep in our article, ‘Five Ways Exercise Helps You Sleep‘.

Be Mindful Of What You Eat And Drink

Avoid caffeine in the afternoon and limit your overall intake during the day. Caffeine wakes you up and increases stress, which will only make sleeping harder. It’s also a good idea to avoid alcohol; while it can help you fall asleep, it creates a rebound effect that wakes you up earlier than you’d like. Avoiding overly sugary or fatty foods will improve the quality of your sleep as these are bad for your health, hormones and, consequently, your sleep. You could instead try soy products, like tofu, soybeans, and soymilk, as they contain phytoestrogen, a plant hormone similar to oestrogen. This may help to relieve hot flushes, so you can enjoy an undisturbed sleep. Also, increased need to urinate is a menopausal symptom, so limit your overall liquid intake late at night. It’s also a good idea to go to the bathroom one last time before going to bed. However, keep a cool glass of water by your bed during the night in case you wake up from a hot flush and need to cool down.

Are Menopause and Insomnia Linked?

‘The Change’, ‘The Climacteric’, ‘the time of life’ – whatever you want to call it, all women will experience the menopause. It’s a time of major change in every woman’s life. During perimenopause (the time period leading to your last menstrual period), your ovaries...

Cooling Products That Work to Help You Sleep

Disrupted sleep is one of the most common problems that women experience with menopause. From hot flushes and night sweats, getting a good night’s sleep can be a challenge. Without a good sleep, you’ll wake up feeling irritable and moody, and this may only make your...

Six Myths About the Menopause and the Truth Behind Them

Although every woman experiences the menopause, every woman will experience it differently. Because of this, there are many different perspectives about the menopause and its symptoms. Below, you’ll find six of the most common myths of menopause and the truth behind...

Treating Menopausal Symptoms for Better Sleep Quality

Menopause can be a time of major hormonal, physical and psychological change for women. Although symptoms vary from woman to woman, “as many as 61%” of women have reported insomnia problems   , both during perimenopause and post-menopause. Difficulty sleeping during...

Signs That You May Have the Menopause

Although all women experience the menopause, some will be fortunate enough to breeze through it without struggling with any symptoms. However, most women will experience menopausal symptoms, some of which can be quite severe and affect your...

What Is the Menopause?

‘The Change’, ‘the Climacteric’, ‘the time of life’, whatever you want to call it; all woman will experience the menopause, but what is it? As a woman gets older, there is a change in the balance of the body’s sex hormones. Your ovaries stop producing as much of the...

Signs That You May Have the Menopause

Signs That You May Have the Menopause

Although all women experience the menopause, some will be fortunate enough to breeze through it without struggling with any symptoms. However, most women will experience menopausal symptoms, some of which can be quite severe and affect your daily life and activities. Menopausal symptoms can begin months, or even years, before your periods stop, and can last around four years after your last period. Although, some women may experience symptoms for much longer.

As menopause itself is when you have not experienced menstruation for one full year, the time you experience symptoms is more commonly known as ‘perimenopause’, which occurs before menopause. Perimenopause is when your hormones begin to change in preparation for menopause and can last either a few months or several years. Many women begin perimenopause at some point after their mid-forties, while some women may skip perimenopause and enter menopause suddenly. During perimenopause, menstrual periods become irregular and your periods may be late or early, or you may completely skip one or more periods. The menstrual flow itself may also become heavier or lighter.

As well as irregular periods, women will experience other menopausal symptoms, such as;

  • Hot flushes
  • Chills
  • Night sweats
  • Vaginal dryness and discomfort during sex
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Fatigue
  • Low mood or anxiety
  • Reduced sex drive (libido)
  • Problems with memory and concentration
  • Frequent urination
  • Weight gain
  • Thinning hair and dry skin
  • Loss of breast fullness and breast pain

If you have experienced any of these menopausal symptoms, talk to your doctor. You should also consult your doctor if you’re experiencing symptoms and are younger than forty-five. Your doctor can usually confirm whether you’re menopausal based on your symptoms alone, but a blood test to measure your hormone levels may be required if you’re under forty-five.1

 

Are Menopause and Insomnia Linked?

‘The Change’, ‘The Climacteric’, ‘the time of life’ – whatever you want to call it, all women will experience the menopause. It’s a time of major change in every woman’s life. During perimenopause (the time period leading to your last menstrual period), your ovaries...

Cooling Products That Work to Help You Sleep

Disrupted sleep is one of the most common problems that women experience with menopause. From hot flushes and night sweats, getting a good night’s sleep can be a challenge. Without a good sleep, you’ll wake up feeling irritable and moody, and this may only make your...

Six Myths About the Menopause and the Truth Behind Them

Although every woman experiences the menopause, every woman will experience it differently. Because of this, there are many different perspectives about the menopause and its symptoms. Below, you’ll find six of the most common myths of menopause and the truth behind...

Treating Menopausal Symptoms for Better Sleep Quality

Menopause can be a time of major hormonal, physical and psychological change for women. Although symptoms vary from woman to woman, “as many as 61%” of women have reported insomnia problems   , both during perimenopause and post-menopause. Difficulty sleeping during...

Signs That You May Have the Menopause

Although all women experience the menopause, some will be fortunate enough to breeze through it without struggling with any symptoms. However, most women will experience menopausal symptoms, some of which can be quite severe and affect your...

What Is the Menopause?

‘The Change’, ‘the Climacteric’, ‘the time of life’, whatever you want to call it; all woman will experience the menopause, but what is it? As a woman gets older, there is a change in the balance of the body’s sex hormones. Your ovaries stop producing as much of the...

What Is the Menopause?

What Is the Menopause?

‘The Change’, ‘the Climacteric’, ‘the time of life’, whatever you want to call it; all woman will experience the menopause, but what is it?

As a woman gets older, there is a change in the balance of the body’s sex hormones. Your ovaries stop producing as much of the hormone ‘oestrogen’ and no longer release an egg each month. Periods will start to become less frequent over the course of a few months or years until they stop altogether, and a woman will no longer be able to get pregnant naturally. This change typically occurs when a woman is aged between forty-five and fifty-five, with the average age for women to reach the menopause in the UK being fifty-one.1

In a few exceptional cases, women may become menopausal in their thirties, or even younger. This is known as premature menopause, or premature ovarian insufficiency.

When Will You Reach the Menopause?

You’re said to have reached the menopause if you haven’t had a period for at least a year, but this is a gradual change. For a few years before you reach the menopause, your periods will become irregular. They’ll happen either more often or less often than they used to. You may also find that you have slightly heavier periods. This stage is the ‘perimenopause’, or menopausal transition, and can last for about four years. For some, this stage may last longer.

At around the age of fifty to fifty-five years, the monthly cycle stops completely. This means that you won’t have any more ovulations, no more periods, and no more pregnancies.

Does Anything Cause the Menopause?

Sometimes, the menopause is a result of some breast cancer treatments, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy. It can even be brought on by an underlying medical condition, such as Down’s syndrome or Addison’s disease.2 If a woman has an oophorectomy (surgery to remove the ovaries) then she will experience immediate menopause as a result of this.
Although all women experience the menopause, it is never the same for two women. Some will breeze through a hassle-free menopause, while others will struggle through rising symptoms. Whether you notice a dramatic change or not, remember that your health is important, and it’s your responsibility; this is a time when your body deserves some tender loving care.

Are Menopause and Insomnia Linked?

‘The Change’, ‘The Climacteric’, ‘the time of life’ – whatever you want to call it, all women will experience the menopause. It’s a time of major change in every woman’s life. During perimenopause (the time period leading to your last menstrual period), your ovaries...

Cooling Products That Work to Help You Sleep

Disrupted sleep is one of the most common problems that women experience with menopause. From hot flushes and night sweats, getting a good night’s sleep can be a challenge. Without a good sleep, you’ll wake up feeling irritable and moody, and this may only make your...

Six Myths About the Menopause and the Truth Behind Them

Although every woman experiences the menopause, every woman will experience it differently. Because of this, there are many different perspectives about the menopause and its symptoms. Below, you’ll find six of the most common myths of menopause and the truth behind...

Treating Menopausal Symptoms for Better Sleep Quality

Menopause can be a time of major hormonal, physical and psychological change for women. Although symptoms vary from woman to woman, “as many as 61%” of women have reported insomnia problems   , both during perimenopause and post-menopause. Difficulty sleeping during...

Signs That You May Have the Menopause

Although all women experience the menopause, some will be fortunate enough to breeze through it without struggling with any symptoms. However, most women will experience menopausal symptoms, some of which can be quite severe and affect your...

What Is the Menopause?

‘The Change’, ‘the Climacteric’, ‘the time of life’, whatever you want to call it; all woman will experience the menopause, but what is it? As a woman gets older, there is a change in the balance of the body’s sex hormones. Your ovaries stop producing as much of the...